Collection: Pepper Seeds (Heirloom)

Heirloom peppers are simple to cultivate and provide a large number of tasty fruits. Peppers go with almost every recipe and are high in antioxidants. Heirloom peppers grow well in hot regions and are resistant to drought and wildlife. Eden Brothers has a pepper for everyone, whether you like them sweet or hot. There's something for the whole family to enjoy at the dinner table with varieties including Ancho Poblano, Habanero Orange, and California Wonder.

What we love about planting heirloom pepper seeds

  • 48 pepper seed varieties
  • Thrives in bright, sunny growing areas
  • Great for container gardens
  • Selection showcases both sweet and hot peppers- something for all your culinary needs

What we love about planting heirloom pepper seeds

  • %count% pepper seed varieties
  • Thrives in bright, sunny growing areas
  • Great for container gardens
  • Selection showcases both sweet and hot peppers- something for all your culinary needs

The best selection of heirloom peppers to grow at home

Peppers are frequently confined to a few types at the supermarket—sweet bell peppers and, if you're lucky, jalapenos. Wouldn't it be nice to have a bit more variety?

On the "Dirty Dozen" list, peppers are a popular vegetable. Chemical contamination is likely to be present in conventionally cultivated peppers. Why not produce your own heirloom peppers this year instead of buying expensive, contaminated peppers from the store?

How to grow heirloom pepper seeds

Zones 4 through 10 are suitable for these heat-loving annuals. Heirloom peppers can be started inside or directly sown two months before the final spring frost, but only after the soil temperature reaches 70°F. Patience is required for peppers to grow and yield fruit, but the wait is well worth it!

Heirloom peppers are resistant to a variety of pests, making them a good companion for a variety of other vegetables in your garden. Intercropping varieties like Anaheim chili with radishes, chard, or carrots will help reduce weeds and will be harvested before peppers, allowing the peppers to develop and occupy the area. Just be careful not to overwater the pepper plants, as they are susceptible to root rot. Even if you live in a colder region, you can still eat heirloom peppers straight from the garden! For the healthiest plants, use landscaping cloth or grow your peppers beneath plastic.

How to harvest heirloom peppers for the best taste

Start heirloom peppers in groups of three, then trim down one and transplant the other two together. Pairs should be spaced approximately a foot and a half apart. Some heirloom pepper types benefit from the use of a stake or wire cage for support. Mulching the row with wood chips or straw helps to keep moisture in the soil, which is beneficial to the plants. When the fruit fills out and ridges develop, it's time to harvest heirloom peppers. Heirloom peppers can be collected when they are still green, but the flavor improves as the fruit ripens to orange and red.

The health benefits of heirloom peppers

Heirloom chili peppers are high in Vitamin C and anti-inflammatory compounds. They contain cancer-fighting chemicals and can help to relieve migraines and sinus infections! Not only that, but heirloom peppers can also help to decrease blood pressure and ease digestion.

What to plant with heirloom peppers

Because heirloom peppers are so low-maintenance, there's no excuse not to produce your own. Along with your tomatoes and onions, plant heirloom peppers in your garden. Consider all the salsas, stuffed bell peppers, and grilled chilies you'll be making this summer! Chopped peppers store nicely, so you'll be able to taste your summer garden while you're enjoying chili and roasted bell peppers in the dead of winter.

Eden Brothers sells over 30 different sweet pepper and fiery chile kinds! Why not put some of them to the test this season?

For more information about planting, growing, and harvesting heirloom pepper seeds, see the Pepper Seeds Planting Guide.