Collection: Dianthus Seeds (Heirloom)

Dianthus, also known as Sweet William, is a lovely, delicate flower that is easy to grow and lasts for a long time! Dianthus grows best in hot, humid climates, but it will grow well in any part of the United States. You may deadhead the flowers as they fade to keep your dianthus blooming—many kinds will rebloom! Try the Tall Double Mix if you enjoy cut flowers and home decor. You'll be smitten!

Growing heirloom dianthus in your garden

  • 15+ heirloom dianthus seed varieties
  • Easy to grow with beautiful results
  • Comes in a variety of colors and blooms
  • Prefers full sun exposure

Growing heirloom dianthus in your garden

  • 15+ heirloom dianthus seed varieties
  • Easy to grow with beautiful results
  • Comes in a variety of colors and blooms
  • Prefers full sun exposure

Grow the best heirloom dianthus flowers

The name Dianthus comes from the Greek language, as do many flower names. The dianthus, which derives its name from the Greek words dios ("of Zeus") and anthos ("flower"), has a lot to live up to. According to legend, the color pink was called after the flower because of its perforated borders. Pinking was first used as a verb in the 14th century to denote decorating with a punched or perforated pattern. It's simple to spot the relationship while looking at the edges of a dianthus. It appears as if nature has decided to cut this species with pinking shears.

Wonderful uses for heirloom dianthus

Many heirloom dianthus species have a delightfully aromatic perfume that only adds to their beauty. The majority are native to Europe and Asia, with a few from North America. There is even one alpine species that is native to North America's arctic regions. Carnations and sweet William are well-known dianthus flowers. They've long been a favored flower for rockeries and cottage gardens. Carnations, in particular, have grown in popularity as a result of their widespread use in cut flower arrangements.

How to plant and tend to heirloom dianthus

Although most dianthus are perennials, some are annual or biennial. The frilled, pinked borders that earned the blooms their name are most commonly pink in color. The planting instructions for the various types of heirloom dianthus may differ, so consult the specific planting guides. However, practically all types prefer to be in full light (at least six hours of sun a day). When planting heirloom dianthus, it's also crucial to consider appropriate air circulation. The soil should be nutrient-rich and well-draining, with two to four inches of compost added to keep it that way. Seeds should be started indoors up to eight weeks before being transplanted outside. After the first hard frost, apply a four-inch layer of mulch for protection during the cold winter months, then remove it once new growth emerges in the spring.

For more information about planting, growing, and caring for heirloom dianthus seeds, see the Dianthus Seeds Planting Guide.