Collection: Chamomile Seeds (Heirloom)

While the two types of heirloom chamomile can be used interchangeably in tea, there are some differences between them. Heirloom Roman chamomile seeds grow into a lovely low groundcover with fluffy leaves and tiny, white daisy-like blossoms. Heirloom German chamomile seeds produce a plant that is slightly higher and bushier than regular heirloom chamomile. Both yield fragrant petals that may be simply picked from your garden and steeped in hot water to make your own soothing tea. In the landscape, they both look wonderful.

About our heirloom chamomile seeds

  • Heirloom annual ornamental herb
  • Beautiful daisy-like blooms
  • Variety of beneficial properties and uses
  • Prefers full sun conditions

About our heirloom chamomile seeds

  • Heirloom annual ornamental herb
  • Beautiful daisy-like blooms
  • Variety of beneficial properties and uses
  • Prefers full sun conditions

The wonderful benefits of heirloom chamomile

Chamomile tea, which can be made from either German or Roman heirloom chamomile flowers, is well-known for its relaxing and sedative qualities. Heirloom chamomile has therapeutic characteristics, and its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and mild astringent properties aid with a variety of common health problems. It's available as a tea, tincture, lotion, capsules, or drops.

This daisy-like plant is a member of the Asteraceae family, which includes sunflowers, Echinacea, and marigold. Chamomile gets its name from the Greek word chamomaela, which means "ground apple," and refers to the aroma it emits. Chamomile has a lengthy history, stretching back thousands of years to at least ancient Egyptian times. The well-known herb has a wide range of useful characteristics and applications. This year, try growing heirloom chamomile in your own herb garden.

Grow the best heirloom chamomile in your garden

Heirloom chamomile seeds should be direct-sown in late autumn, after the first killing frost, to allow the seeds to naturally cold stratify. Start seeds inside about six weeks before the last frost date for spring planting. The best temperature for heirloom chamomile to germinate is 65°F. Heirloom chamomile grows best in full sun, although it can also be grown in moderate shade. Use a well-drained, rich, organic soil.

Sow your seeds directly on the soil's surface. Seeds need direct sunlight to germinate, so don't cover them. Thin out seedlings to one plant every two to four inches once they reach about one inch in height. If you're growing heirloom chamomile indoors, be careful to transplant before the first blossoms appear. Once the heirloom chamomile bloom has fully opened, harvest it. Heirloom chamomile flowers can be used fresh or dried, depending on your preference. Late spring to early summer is the best time to collect foliage.

Companion Plants for Heirloom Chamomile

Heirloom chamomile may be highly useful in the garden, stimulating development and even treating neighboring plants, in addition to its ornamental and medicinal characteristics. bee balm, phlox, Black Eyed Susan, lungwort, astilbe, bleeding heart, and delphiniums are all good heirloom chamomile companion plants.

For more information about planting, growing, and caring for heirloom chamomile seed, see the Chamomile Seeds Planting Guide.