Collection: Cabbage Seeds (Heirloom)

Heirloom cabbage is a green, purple, or white leafy vegetable farmed for its densely leaved heads. It has a circular head that grows from a short, thick stem, and thick, alternating leaves with wavy or lobed borders. A cabbage's roots are fibrous and shallow. Broccoli and cauliflower are close relatives to this abundant, thick, and very nutritious vegetable. A perfect addition to your vegetable garden!

About our heirloom cabbage seeds

  • 6 heirloom cabbage seed varieties
  • Great source of vitamins K, A and C
  • Cool-season, annual vegetables
  • Perfect for microgreens

About our heirloom cabbage seeds

  • 6 heirloom cabbage seed varieties
  • Great source of vitamins K, A and C
  • Cool-season, annual vegetables
  • Perfect for microgreens

Great Heirloom Cabbage Varieties to Grow at Home

Green and red heirloom cabbage are among the most prolific cool-season crops, as they are dependable, nutritious, and excellent raw or cooked. Gardeners may cultivate two cabbage crops every year, as they do well in the spring and again in the fall, and they are easy to grow from seed. All of the heirloom cabbage varieties we sell are at their peak in late autumn, when they sweeten somewhat with a little frost.

Most of us are picky about which cabbages we cultivate in our gardens, because huge solid heads take up more area than other crops but reward your hard labor with substantial, nutritious yields. Eden Brothers' Charleston Wakefield Cabbage Seeds and Copenhagen Market Cabbage Seeds are two of our most popular green cabbage seed varieties. Alternatively, consider our Red Acre Cabbage Seeds, which offer higher amounts of vitamins A and C than other cabbage seed varieties and a vibrant color that looks great in the garden and on the plate.

How to Grow Cabbage in your Garden

Heirloom cabbage seeds should be started inside six to eight weeks before the last spring frost. Place the seeds in direct sunlight or, if necessary, beneath a grow light. The best soil temperature for growing heirloom cabbages is 60 to 65°F. Plant three to four seeds at a depth of 1/4 inch. Harden off and transplant seedlings outside with approximately 24 inches between plants once they reach three to four inches tall, or two to three weeks before the last expected spring frost. Choose a location with plenty of sunlight and friable, well-draining soil. Heirloom cabbage plants need about two inches of water per week to stay healthy. Heirloom cabbage should be harvested after around 70 days, or when the heads have reached the desired size and firmness. Cut the heirloom cabbage at the base with a sharp knife and remove any yellow leaves before bringing it indoors or putting it in the shade.

Cooking with Heirloom Cabbage

This leafy plant is grown for its densely leaved heads, which are frequently used in a variety of culinary applications. Heirloom cabbage can be eaten raw, pickled, fermented, steamed, stewed, sautéed, or braised.

For more information about planting, growing, and caring for heirloom cabbage seeds, see the Cabbage Seeds Planting Guide.