Collection: Black Eyed Susan Seeds (Heirloom)

The addition of our own native heirloom Black Eyed Susan to any wildflower meadow makes it whole. This wildflower grows to make its home in almost any sunny place, with a blast of bright yellow shooting up from its dark center. This wildflower prefers to be undisturbed after planting, and it will reseed prolifically in one or two seasons to revitalize an often neglected stretch of land.

Growing heirloom Black Eyed Susans in your garden

  • 8 heirloom Black Eyed Susan seed varieties
  • Easy to grow and maintain
  • Pollinator attractor
  • Thrives in full or partial sun conditions

Growing heirloom Black Eyed Susans in your garden

  • %count% heirloom Black Eyed Susan seed varieties
  • Easy to grow and maintain
  • Pollinator attractor
  • Thrives in full or partial sun conditions

Add the Best Heirloom Black Eyed Susans to your Garden

The heirloom Black Eyed Susan is a mainstay of any wildflower meadow and is possibly the most iconic of the classic North American wildflowers. These blossoms are often referred to as "pioneer plants" since they are the first to emerge after a fire or natural calamity. This aster-family herbaceous plant is native to the eastern and central United States, but it has become naturalized throughout North America.

Growing conditions for heirloom black eyed susan seeds

Heirloom Black Eyed Susans, also known by their formal name Rudbeckia hirta, can be grown in a variety of soils, ranging from sand to clay, as long as the soil temperature is about 70°F. These blossoms are exceptionally hardy and will thrive whether you start them indoors or seed them directly into your flower garden! Despite their ability to thrive in relatively dry soil, heirloom Black Eyed Susans benefit from periodic watering in dry weather and plenty of sunlight. They also enjoy being planted with a variety of other flowers, such as zinnias and Gerber daisies.

How to care for heirloom black eyed susans

Heirloom Black Eyed Susans are tall plants with upright branches and ovate-shaped leaves that grow between 12 and 27 inches tall. To avoid crowding, these fast-growing heirlooms should be planted six to eight inches apart. Depending on your zone and when the seeds are planted, heirloom Black Eyed Susans can bloom in the spring, summer, or fall. It's crucial to remember that these plants mature 60 to 90 days after sowing and prefer to be planted in the spring or fall.

Blooms may not occur in the first year of growth; instead, they usually arrive in the second year. When these new blooms do appear, expect to be met by pollinators like bees and hummingbirds, who will be delighted to see these lovely, daisy-like blossoms! Heirloom Black Eyed Susans are deer resistant, drought resistant, and poor soil tolerant, in addition to being pollinator magnets. To summarize, these flowers are really simple to cultivate and manage, and they make a beautiful, low-maintenance addition to any garden! Additionally, if you want to use your blossoms in a cut flower arrangement, heirloom Black Eyed Susans have a six to ten day vase life and look great with just about any other cut flowers!

Heirloom Black eyed susans in packets or bulk

A packet of Eden Brothers' Heirloom Black Eyed Susans may suffice if planted in a modest area (80 square feet or less). However, this variety is available in packages weighing up to five pounds and covering up to 1.3 acres of ground!

For more information about planting, growing, and caring for heirloom Black Eyed Susan flower seeds, see the Black Eyed Susan Seeds Planting Guide.