Fall in Love With These Bulbs (That Aren’t Tulips)

Thursday, August 30th, 2018

We’ve written quite a bit about tulips lately and for good reason. They’re gorgeous flowers that look great in a vase or in your plant beds. But tulips aren’t the only flowers that grow from bulbs and must be planted in the fall. That’s right, there’s a huge variety of beautiful flowers with different textures, colors and applications to add some serious variety to your garden. So if you’ve got tulips all figured out, here are some other great bulbs—and roots— to try in your garden.

Flower Bulbs Offered at Eden Brothers

Before we get into the varieties of bulbs that you can find on the Eden Brothers online seed & plant marketplace, it’s important to understand what exactly a bulb is, and how they can be used in your home garden. A bulb is actually a living plant that starts its “life” as an underground mass, made up of the plant’s food and tissue that will eventually grow into the above-ground plant that most of us are familiar with. This tissue, commonly referred to as scales, are mostly made up of carbohydrates that will fuel the plant’s initial growth. By planting a bulb in the cooler months of fall, the bulb will be able to establish a root system that will allow it to make it through the winter unharmed. Surprisingly, frozen ground and snow will actually insulate the soil just enough that the bulbs will be unharmed. Come springtime, you’ll have a wide variety of stunning blooms surrounding your home!

Daffodil

Synonymous with spring, Daffodils look like big stars blowing a kiss! Emerging in mid spring, they are a medium height flower that are sure to add to the beauty of your garden design. They’re deer resistant, but you’ll find their sunny disposition irresistible. Don’t tell the others but these are definitely one of our favorite species. Versatile and resilient, they do well in a variety of climates and conditions—and can come back year after year making them a hassle free bulb.

Peony

These delicate, puffy flowers are a favorite addition of wedding bouquets, adding an impressive volume and feathery texture. They’re very popular and therefore very expensive. The secret, of course, is to grow them yourself. They don’t grow from bulbs, but from roots planted in the fall.

They’re easy to grow and deer don’t bother them. The best part about growing Peonies besides the beauty of them? They emit an intoxicating aroma which you’ll love to have throughout your home and garden.

Hyacinth

Fragrant, colorful and stunning—hyacinth should definitely be on your list. Reminiscent of puffs of cotton candy, these fun flowers will add some serious intrigue to your garden beds. available in an almost unbelievable variety of colors, shapes and textures, you will want to collect every variety as they nearly look like different flowers altogether.

Flowering in the early spring, they’re renowned for their adaptability to many climates and conditions. If you want a seriously colorful and eye-catching flower to plant—look no further.

Allium Giganteum

If ever there was a Pinterest worthy flower, the Allium Giganteum might take the cake. Huge, eye catching flowers, they’re often described as something Dr. Seuss would have cooked up in one of his stories.

Deer resistant, diverse and totally unique, they’ve been gaining in popularity every year thanks to their impressiveness. They are alliums and in fact are wild flowering onions that are more show than taste. Blooms the size of softballs and 5 ft tall stalks? You’ll have many people talking about these showstoppers.

Daylily

The daylily may be one of the most common of the group, but for good reason. Their unmistakable shape and flashy color makes them an old standbys to any flower garden. They’re such a staple that their a favorite of commercial landscapers who use them for their showiness and consistent flowering.

They’re not just a pretty face, by the way. Some daylilies are actually edible and commonly cooked with by wise, knowledgeable gardeners!

Dutch Iris

Another excellent option for your bulb bed, Dutch Iris can reach heights of up to 4 feet and can be grown in hardiness zones 3 through 10! Last on this list, but certainly not least, some varieties bloom twice a year—extending their beauty and making them an excellent choice when low maintenance is important.

Elegant, soft and beautiful, you would be remiss to forget to include these in your next fall bulb planting!

 

Fall is quickly approaching and our bulbs and roots are a hot commodity when the time comes to plant! If you’re ready to add bulbs to your beds, start planning now so you can be ready to plant when the time comes! What are your favorite bulb plants? We’d love to hear about them in the comments below!