Collection: Coreopsis Seeds (Heirloom)

A sea of these gloriously wild yellow, crimson, and bi-colored heirloom coreopsis blooms completes any prairie setting. Heirloom coreopsis is a perennial that grows one to three feet tall and blooms in the early summer and will continue to bloom into the fall with the help of deadheading. Heirloom coreopsis seeds go well with other prairie flowers like coneflowers and gaillardia, making them an excellent choice for cottage gardens. Snip a few from your garden and bring them in; they also make lovely cut flowers.

Growing heirloom coreopsis in your garden

  • 4 heirloom coreopsis seed varieties
  • Sometimes called tickseed
  • Attracts hummingbirds and other pollinators
  • Prefers full sun exposure or partial shade

Growing heirloom coreopsis in your garden

  • 4 heirloom coreopsis seed varieties
  • Sometimes called tickseed
  • Attracts hummingbirds and other pollinators
  • Prefers full sun exposure or partial shade

Grow heirloom coreopsis in your pollinator garden

Tickseed is a common name for heirloom coreopsis because the seeds resemble ticks at first glance. Coreopsis is derived from the Greek words koris (meaning bedbug) and opsis (meaning view). The shape of the plant's dry fruit is alluded to this. To be clear, the nickname tickseed is derived solely from a visual comparison, and this floral species does not attract ticks. Pollinators such as bees and hummingbirds, on the other hand, are drawn to it.

Heirloom coreopsis is a flowering plant native to North, central, and South America that grows in erect clumps with spectacular flower heads. This plant is low-maintenance, drought-tolerant, blooms for a long time, and is hardy! Throughout the spring and summer, you'll see these beautiful blooms on roadsides, fields, and in gardens. Furthermore, planting your own heirloom coreopsis plants is low-maintenance, and you can expect them to blossom in their first growing season! Drought tolerant and poor soil tolerant, as well as deer and rabbit resistant, heirloom coreopsis is a fantastic choice!

How to sow heirloom coreopsis seeds

Sow heirloom coreopsis seeds straight into your garden after all threats of frost have passed, or start them indoors six to eight weeks before the final spring frost. Heirloom coreopsis grows best on well-drained, dry to medium-moisture soils with full sun exposure. Because heirloom coreopsis requires sunlight to develop well, sow the seeds and very lightly cover them. Within 21 to 28 days, the seeds will germinate.

When sowing seeds outside or transplanting seedlings outdoors, ensure the plants are eight to twelve inches apart. Heirloom coreopsis plants take 60 to 90 days to achieve full maturity after seeds are sown. For more consistent blooming, make sure to water regularly and sow extra seeds every few weeks.

The best care for heirloom coreopsis plants

If the foliage on heirloom coreopsis plants becomes untidy in the summer, cut it back. It's also a good idea to deadhead spent flowers to encourage more flowering and avoid self-seeding. Divide clumps every two to three years once your heirloom coreopsis plants are established in the garden.

Great companion plants for heirloom coreopsis

Salvia, daisies, lilies, gayfeather, and coneflowers are all good companion plants for heirloom coreopsis! These lovely plants thrive in beds and borders, as well as used for groundcover, cut-flower gardens, and container gardens.

For more information about planting, growing, and caring for heirloom coreopsis flower seed, see the Coreopsis Seeds Planting Guide.