Collection: Foxglove (Digitalis) Seeds

Foxglove is a stunning flower with clustering tubular blossoms, growing in colors of red, white, yellow, pink, and purple and adding a unique beauty to any landscape. According to a 19th century botany book, the very ancient name "foxglove" is described as such: "The folks of our ancestors were the fairies and nothing is more likely than that the pretty coloured bells of the plant would be designated 'folksgloves,' afterwards, 'foxglove'.

Planting the best foxglove seeds

  • 6 foxglove seed varieties
  • Easy to grow and maintain
  • Attracts butterflies and other pollinators
  • Creates a dramatic effect with its tall spires of flowers

Planting the best foxglove seeds

  • 6 foxglove seed varieties
  • Easy to grow and maintain
  • Attracts butterflies and other pollinators
  • Creates a dramatic effect with its tall spires of flowers

all about foxglove seeds

Foxglove, botanically known as Digitalis purpurea, is a unique and eye-catching flower that originated in Europe. However, over the years foxglove has spread widely throughout North America. Plant this beautifully tall, vintage flower in partial sunlight where moisture retention is key. The hotter the summer, the more afternoon shade the plant will need. Attention should be given to keeping children and pets away from foxglove, as all parts can be toxic when consumed.

Foxglove is deer resistant, rabbit resistant, and urban pollution tolerant!

growing foxglove flowers from seed

Sow your foxglove seeds directly into the garden after all threat of frost has passed. If starting your seeds indoors, do so 8 to 10 weeks before the final frost. These flowers perform best in full sun conditions but will tolerate some shade if necessary. In warmer zones, some shade will be preferred. Foxglove plants are sensitive to heavy wind exposure, so be mindful when choosing your planting site. Foxglove prefers rich, loamy, and well-draining soil. You may choose to amend the soil with compost, as well.

Wet the soil and scatter your foxglove seeds onto the surface and compress gently. These seeds require light to germinate to be careful not to cover them with soil. Once your seedlings have two or more leaves, thin back your plants to every 12 to 18 inches.

After the foxglove plants are established, mulch around the plants' base to help them retain moisture. This mulch can also aid in insulating the roots during the cold seasons. Because these plants grow to heights of up to 60 inches, they may require staking. If the goal is for your foxglove plants to return season after season, do not deadhead the flowers when they begin to die back.

friends of foxglove

Companion plants for foxglove flowers include delphiniums, daisies, peonies, snapdragons, and irises! These flowers are great in beds and borders, woodlands, and naturalized areas. Other nicknames for foxglove are lion's mouth, fairy caps, folk's glove, and witches thimbles.

For more information about planting, growing, and caring for foxglove flower seed, see the Foxglove Seeds Planting Guide.